Anzac Day Traditions and Breakfast Ideas

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Anzac Day Traditions

Anzac Day Traditions in Australia is a day to remember all those who served in wars and conflicts. It is an essential public holiday that honours those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for their country, their resilience and their role as inspiration for future generations. In this article, we have outlined some alternative ways to commemorate the Anzacs by engaging in some Aussie delicacies that we are so lucky to enjoy thanks to them.

To help you get inspired for Anzac Day, we’ve developed a list of ideas that might help modernise these traditions. This article also includes a list of traditional Anzac Day food that can be enjoyed on this very memorable day.

The best breakfast for Anzac Day

Many Australians will make the most of Anzac Day by marking it as a day of remembrance, reflected in the traditional eating of a special breakfast.

Gunfire breakfast originally consisted of biscuits and jam but have evolved into a serving of bacon and eggs with beans. The gunfire breakfast was aptly named due to rum or heavy liquor serving over coffee or tea that helped the soldiers feel courageous before going into battle. 

There are a bunch of things you can do this Anzac Day to remember our humble beginnings and show gratitude for where we are today. If you’re after a strong liquor that will complement the taste of Australia and go down smooth, check out the variety of rum for sale online. If you’re looking for a modern twist on the Gunfire breakfast, be sure to check out Gunfire cocktail recipes that are sure to spice up the celebrations this year in a memorable way.

Anzac Biscuits

Anzac Day wouldn’t be complete without a fresh selection of Anzac biscuits. This recipe is easy to execute, and the results are delicious! Even if you don’t consider yourself a baking prodigy, why not give it a shot and make your batch?

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup plain flour
  • 1 cup oats
  • 1 cup desiccated coconut
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 125g butter
  • 2 tbsp golden syrup
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate soda

Method:

  1. Heat the oven to 160°C.
  2. Sift flour into a big mixing cup, followed by rolled oats, coconut, and brown sugar.
  3. In a saucepan, combine the butter, golden syrup, and water. Stir until melted over medium heat, then add bicarbonate soda.
  4. Whisk the butter mixture into the flour mixture when mixed.
  5. Shape the mixture into balls, put it on a plate, and flatten slightly with a fork.
  6. Bake for 10 minutes or until brown

Lamingtons

Lamingtons are an Australian staple dessert, and no Aussie lunch would be complete without them. Delicious fluffy sponge cake dipped in chocolate icing and covered in desiccated coconut. They are a true Australian classic that is easy to make and find on sale in pretty much any bakery or grocery store. 

Beef Pie

You can find meat pies at every corner store across Australia, and rightly so. They’re an absolute staple for Aussie families and a good reason. Everyone loves the taste of freshly baked meat pie, and it’s not one that’s easily forgotten.

The Aussie meat pie is a delicious part of Australian culture, and although Aussies indeed weren’t the first people to have introduced the meat pie to the world, the Aussies have adopted it as their own!

Sausage Rolls

When it comes to classic Australian food, the legendary sausage roll is in a class of its own. A hungry traveller can enjoy one on the go, working, and dancing to “Land Down Under” without a second thought. Many eat one every day for lunch and they never get bored.

You can grab yourself a sausage roll in a pack from any good butcher, supermarket or patisserie in Australia.

Pavlova

Ah, the pavlova. It’s considered a national dish of both New Zealand and Australia, with some controversy about which country it was invented in. According to the New Zealand novel, the billowy dessert was made in honour of the Russian ballet dancer Anna Pavlova by the chef of a Wellington hotel at the time, who drew inspiration from her tutu. On the other hand, Australians say the pavlova was invented in a Perth hotel and named after the ballerina after a diner proclaimed it to be “light as Pavlova.”

 

 

READ  *Dessert Buffet*

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